Category Archives: job design

The Wellness Industry Snoozes Thru the Predictable Scheduling and Clopening Debate

For a group that purports to be committed to wellbeing and helping employees get a good night’s sleep, the wellness industry sure is quiet about the issue of “clopening.” Wellness experts harp on the importance of sleep, and vendors hawk sleep-tracking devices, apps, and programs. But nary a word is spoken about the job conditions  necessary to assure workers… Read More »

“Health Shapes Work and Work Shapes Health”

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, as well as the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and National Public Radio, may have given a boost last week to advocates of employee wellbeing. Here, I refer to what I consider authentic wellbeing — based on workers’ exposure to harmful job conditions and environments — not the store-bought imitation based on wellness websites, apps, incentives,… Read More »

NICE! Good Work Is the Key to Good Employee Health

On June 19, 2015, while the U.S. federal government was determining how much employers should be allowed to fine workers for high blood pressure and cholesterol, the United Kingdom’s quasi-governmental National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) was doing something beneficial for employee wellness. NICE issued evidence-based guidelines for management practices and policies that support employee health.… Read More »

At Work, But Out of Whack

Effort-Reward Imbalance Underpins Worker Stress It may be hard to get your brain around abstract models of stress, especially when they don’t line up with the usual fright-or-flight illustrations or seem remediable by the relaxation tips commonly sold as solutions. But if we care about workers, and how employers may be able to help them, we can’t ignore the harmful… Read More »

Job Strain May Be Making You Ill

Job strain is a particularly insidious form of stress that goes far beyond overflowing inboxes or tight deadlines. It is characterized primarily by organizational environments and job structure in which employees have high levels of demands placed on them and limited control over those demands (that is, low “decisional latitude”). This is the demand-control model… Read More »