Category Archives: overtime

The Batman of Worker Health

A superhero of employee health is John Howard, director of the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety, home of the Total Worker Health® (TWH) program. I was fortunate enough to attend Dr. Howard’s impassioned opening address at the 1st International Symposium to Advance Total Worker Health, which took place at the National Institutes of Health in 2014. Here are a… Read More »

The Wellness Industry Snoozes Thru the Predictable Scheduling and Clopening Debate

For a group that purports to be committed to wellbeing and helping employees get a good night’s sleep, the wellness industry sure is quiet about the issue of “clopening.” Wellness experts harp on the importance of sleep, and vendors hawk sleep-tracking devices, apps, and programs. But nary a word is spoken about the job conditions  necessary to assure workers… Read More »

Job Stress Is In Your Head. Literally.

Or… Half of What I Know About Employee Health I Learned from Concussion Concussion is a movie about employee health as much as it’s about anything. In the movie, the National Football League goes to great lengths to cover up the harm it allows to be inflicted on its players. The league is motivated by fear of liability and its… Read More »

Long Hours Grind Away at Employee Wellbeing

Of all the job conditions known to undermine the wellbeing of employees, few have been as well studied as long work hours and overtime. While we still need convincing evidence that reducing work hours may improve health, the body of knowledge about how work hours erode worker health should persuade employers that this is an area with considerably more potential… Read More »

Job Strain May Be Making You Ill

Job strain is a particularly insidious form of stress that goes far beyond overflowing inboxes or tight deadlines. It is characterized primarily by organizational environments and job structure in which employees have high levels of demands placed on them and limited control over those demands (that is, low “decisional latitude”). This is the demand-control model… Read More »